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10, 000 (in words: TEN THOUSAND)
#1
is the number of pictures I have taken with my 350D!! Raise the glases with me!
To be precise, it's now 10, 015 or ten-thousand-and-fifteen....

here is my 10, 000th picture.
I wish it was a better exposure, but I was just playing around.
My subject is my tired and overworked fiancé, who just went back into work at 10pm EST, and who is also the generous sponsor of my photographic endeavors.

[Image: IMG_0001_cr.jpg]

I was curious to see what the camera would do once I reach 10,000, and unfortunately, it jumps back to #1,
which could create a problem in the futur. So I have to work out a save file naming system to avoid confusion.

Alltogether, I've had a great time with this camera, I am very convinced of its qualities and hope it will last a few 10,000 pictures longer!

Uli
#2
BTW,

here's #10,015

[Image: IMG_0015_cr.jpg]

:-))

uli
#3
Wow, quite a milestone.

I've had my 300D for over a year and a half and have taken just over 6600 images to date.
#4
I was wondering... it seems like a lot of pictures to me, especially thinking of a shutter's predicted life span. If I continue at this rate, I'll have to get a new body every two years!
#5
Congratulations, that's a big number. Instead of worrying about how quickly you're wearing out your camera, think about how much money you've saved by not buying 278 rolls of film. Not to mention the storage space you'd need...

It took me 14 months to roll the counter on my Sony F828, and about ten months for my E-1. (With only about five good photos between them.) Did I mention that I have three cameras? I'm at about 11000 for each of my two big ones, with another 8300 on my little P&S in over three years. (Maybe eight good photos total.) Organizing three cameras is a lot of fun. They all use different naming systems.

My way to keep track is to use a program that renames them and moves them from the memory card, dumping everything into one "Incoming" folder. It assigns a unique import number, the code "img", and keeps the camera's exposure number. So, a file I just downloaded from my Elph is "8666--img8293.jpg", and the one from my Sony imported before that is "8665--img1096.jpg". Any time I save an edited file, I keep the exposure number intact. All of my images posted on-line also keep this number, either in the file name or (on flickr) in the description itself. If I ever want to find the original image again, all I need to search on is "imgXXXX", and it will pull up only a handful of possible matches. It's a long way from a proper image management method, but it's easy and solves my naming problem.
matthewpiers.com • @matthewpiers | robertsonphoto.blogspot.com | @thewsreviews • thewsreviews.com
#6
Looks like you have paid for the 350D in savings from buying all those films (without even countng the processing cost).
Canon stuff.
#7
Congrats on your milestone, wulinka.
My first camera odometer rollover was just a few months ago, and it was just a snapshot of some puppies that crawled under my back fence.

I just add the date and some descriptive title words to each folder I upload from the camera, and it helps that I ALWAYS upload my photos as soon as possible. As soon as I get home.
'Chronological with hints' is the best way to describe my system, but it works for me.
Random grab shots are hard to find, but it's always fun looking for them.
#8
oh the shock! wiht a rough look by the filename, it says about 38000? have I really taken that many pictures? wow? or maybe it jumped when i lent my camera out and another CF card was put in Smile
#9
Matthew, that sounds like an easy enough yet functional system! I do want to have consecutive numbers, so should start naming my files 10,001 etc.
#10
adam Wrote:oh the shock! wiht a rough look by the filename, it says about 38000? have I really taken that many pictures? wow? or maybe it jumped when i lent my camera out and another CF card was put in Smile
It's possible. If there are photos on your card, with a different number sequence (from another camera) it will restart your counter from the last highest number,
matthewpiers.com • @matthewpiers | robertsonphoto.blogspot.com | @thewsreviews • thewsreviews.com
#11
Congrats Uli... Big Grin

10,000 is a lot... but at the same time it's nowhere near enough! Tongue Don't stop now!
Considering you have no processing costs, what's stopping you from reaching 20, or 30, or 50 thousand?

Think of every shot you've missed because of mis-focus, camera shake, or timing that was slightly off... and now imagine that for each one of those shots you took 2 or 3 bites at the cherry. You'd end up with heaps of shots that have that "you were very lucky to get that shot" feel to them, but really it isn't luck at all. If you shoot more, the "lucky" shots will come more often. Its that simple. Smile
Of course I'm not pointing the finger at you here Uli... 10,000 shots (in just under 12 months?) is still a lot. Its just a comment in general. We should all shoot more, myself included. Smile

Mind you, Craig... you should be ashamed of yourself. 6600 in 18 months? tsk tsk! I've taken more than that in a single week (at the water polo champs) Tongue Get out there and shoot more! And then post more pics. Big Grin And I'm sure there are plenty of lurkers reading this thread who have shot a lot less than Craig.... go on... get out there! shoo! Big Grin

And I wouldn't be too worried about shutter life Uli. I've put over 35,000 shots on my 350D in 12 months and it is still performing flawlessly. I've never heard of a shutter failing on a 350D, and I'm sure there are plenty out there with much higher milage than mine. Big Grin

Adam, Matthew is correct about the file numbering getting mixed up when you swap CF cards from another Canon camera that already has photos on it. When the 350D (and no doubt 300D) goes to write a file, it uses a sequence number that is higher than the highest number on the card, and then that becomes the new counter for next time. As far as I know there is no way to "get it back" without resetting it to zero. So the file number isn't a reliable counter unless you know you've only had your own CF cards in the camera.

And Keith, that filing system you describe sounds very similar to the method I use. Very simple, requires no extra time or special software (ideal when you use a number of PC's to download your photos), yet I can find my photos very quickly. Why make things more complex than they need to be?
Adrian Broughton
My Website: www.BroughtonPhoto.com.au
My Blog: blog.BroughtonPhoto.com.au
You can also visit me on Facebook!
"Everything should be made as simple as possible, but no simpler." - Einstein.
#12
actually, 10,000 in pretty exactly 5 (five) months, kombi....... I am not shy to say that! Big Grin
#13
ooo! Good effort Uli! Big Grin
Adrian Broughton
My Website: www.BroughtonPhoto.com.au
My Blog: blog.BroughtonPhoto.com.au
You can also visit me on Facebook!
"Everything should be made as simple as possible, but no simpler." - Einstein.
#14
My own system of filing it to label the file with the location I was shooting, or the purpose of the trip, and then the date and time the file was shot from the exif data.

ACDSee will do this automatically in batch renaming.
#15
Congrats Uli.. I think I'm around 4-5K Big Grin

May you have many more joyful ones Smile
#16
I sometimes reformat my card and reset the numbers, but I have 5 GB in pics on a hard drive + a few more folders on the pc hard drive and the seem to range from 1mb to 2.5 mb per photo.
I cant do the maths on that though.
All since February this year.
Lumix LX5.
Canon 350 D.+ 18-55 Kit lens + Tamron 70-300 macro. + Canon 50mm f1.8 + Manfrotto tripod, in bag.
  


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