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50mm Prime lens.
#1
I have read the magazines and surfed the web for the next piece of kit I should have. The overwhelming evidence was that I must have a Prime Lens.
So my dear Wife got one for my Canon100D camera.
Problem is the when I try to take some shots the camera does not work, that is, take the shot.
I used the lens recently at a family gathering in a restaurant and while some were fine most of them were "fuzzy" and not clear at all.
There is obviously something wrong with my technique levels as I cannot blame the Lens or even the camera.
So what is it?
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#2
Just because the lens fits the camera doesn't mean it is meant for that camera. It sounds to me as though the lens doesn't auto focus (blurred images) and may well ignore other auto functions. Post details of the lens (maybe round the glass) and we can let you know. I have a prime lens I use with my Nikon D80 which though it fits has no auto functions. I have to use it in manual and though the camera sets the shutter speed I have to adjust the aperture on the lens itself. I also have to focus manually.
Ask yourself, "What's most important for the final image?".
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#3
Any number of thins could cause "fuzziness", to close to focus (unlikely if you are using the canon 50mm 1.8", to slow of a shutterspeed, to much camera shake, poor lighting etc.

If you could link to or post some samples that are fuzzy, would be easier to work out why. I have two prime lenses and hardly ever use them, they are my last used out of all the lenses i have.
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#4
(Mar 30, 2016, 08:59)EnglishBob Wrote: I have two prime lenses and hardly ever use them, they are my last used out of all the lenses i have.

I'm the opposite. I love my primes and tend to use them in preference to zooms.

I have an 18mm and a 35mm for my Fuji x-Pro - but I also have the x100s which has a fixed 23mm on there. I need to work harder with that one - at the moment I prefer the 35mm focal length.

I also have a 35mm for the Nikon and it's pretty much permanently attached. I love it. I do also have a Tamron 90mm prime which I can use on the Nikon, or with an adaptor on the Fuji (although without any AF on the Fuji). It's old, but it's a gorgeous lens and I got for a song on eBay.

Now pondering on a 50mm for the Nikon, but as I'm not getting much time for photography at the moment I can't really justify it.

Regards
Derek

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#5
(Mar 30, 2016, 08:00)Jocko Wrote: Just because the lens fits the camera doesn't mean it is meant for that camera. It sounds to me as though the lens doesn't auto focus (blurred images) and may well ignore other auto functions. Post details of the lens (maybe round the glass) and we can let you know. I have a prime lens I use with my Nikon D80 which though it fits has no auto functions. I have to use it in manual and though the camera sets the shutter speed I have to adjust the aperture on the lens itself. I also have to focus manually.

CANON EF LENS 50mm 1:1.8 STM
(symbol: maybe diameter) 49mm
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#6
Lens should be perfect for your camera. Does it have a choice of Manual and Auto focus? If so is it switched to AF? My Nikon wont take a photo in Auto mode if it is not focussed, either due to low light or trying to focus too close. As Craig suggested, post a couple of the blurred images so we can have a look.
Ask yourself, "What's most important for the final image?".
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#7
Jim, your description is a bit confusing, as first you write that your camera doesn't work with your 50mm lens, then you write that some shots are fine and some are fuzzy.
Apart from knowing the details of your lens, it might be helpful to other members to know your experience level in photography so far.
Perhaps try turning the Mode Dial on top of the camera to the green A+ setting, and the switch on the side of the lens to AF, and see if that records a reasonable image.

Cheers.
Philip
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#8
(Mar 30, 2016, 11:21)Jocko Wrote: Lens should be perfect for your camera. Does it have a choice of Manual and Auto focus? If so is it switched to AF? My Nikon wont take a photo in Auto mode if it is not focussed, either due to low light or trying to focus too close. As Craig suggested, post a couple of the blurred images so we can have a look.

There is a switch fro AF MF. Currently set to AF.
Would send pics but I need to reduce them to size that satisfies requirements of this program.
Not sure on how to do that yet.
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#9
I have Elements 4. In that, you just go to Standard Edit>Image>Resize.
Ask yourself, "What's most important for the final image?".
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#10
If after the advice above you still have no luck, it might be worth taking a walk along
to your local camera shop, where they should be able to decided if the problem is with the lens or your limited ability, either way you should be able to progress.

RAW to the core.
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#11
Another issue might be closeness to subject? I know my 35mm prime won't focus too close - maybe if you were out with friends and tried to get such shots that could explain the out-of-focus nature of some shots?
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#12
Jim, it may help to make sure that the lens-body contacts are all clean and bright. These are the little gold coloured tabs on the side of the lens mount throat and corresponding contacts on the lens itself. Just rub them gently with a pencil eraser. Not hard enough to get bits of rubber in the camera though.
GrahamS
Take my advice.  I'm not using it.Wink

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#13
there are a number of possible causes:
incompatible lens;
electro mechanical fault with camera;
electro, mechanical, optical fault with the lens;
individual technique, such as -
set to manual instead of autofocus;
need more practice hand holding;
allow camera time to autofocus;
focusing on wrong part of subject;
too slow shutter speed;
A Canon prime lens is obviously compatable with canon body, and you say that some of the shots were ok. Also you don't mention sharpness problems with your other lens/es. So it looks unlikely there are faults with the camera body or lens.

Which brings us to technique. You mention the lens is set correctly to AF (AutoFocus). So consider the other possibilities:
Good hand holding is a technique that needs to be practiced - keeping yourself stable, holding the camera firmly against the cheek with the other hand under the lens (not over the top), elbows tucked in so you and the camera become a stable 'platform'. squeezing the shutter (sort off rolling the finger onto the button, not pressing or stabbing downwards) - at the same time as watching composition, peoples expressions etc is an aquired skill. I practiced for ages when I first got a full frame body (in the front room at home) before I could be fairly sure my hand holding wasn't the problem.

Allow the camera to autofocus - the canon and I expect almost all others has a 2 stage shutter, about 1/2 way to focus, then all the way to shoot. The default option on my Canon is to beep when focus is achieved, and another option allows focus points to light up in red when focus is achieved.

The default for Canons is all focus points active. If something is in the foreground and focuses easily, the face that you wanted may be out of focus. Explore using a single focus point (I mostly use the centre point) and then check the images to see the area you defintely focused on is sharp - where you saw the focus point light up.

Fianally the old rule of thumb that for hand held, non-stabilised lenses the shutter speed should be at least the inverse of the focal length of the camera still holds true - for 50mm lens that means at most 1/50sec exposure and if you are learning your hand-held technique aim for 1/100. So now you need to check your aperture/ shutter speed/ ISO etc - or let the camera take care of a lot of it for you. You don't say if you are using P, Av or Tv. But as a starting point try P (program mode) and make sure ISO is set to auto. P will typically give you a reasonable aperture + shutter speed for a sharp picture. Rotating the front dial will change exposure and speed in sympathy (aiming for 1/100s with your 50mm lens) , then the auto iso will automatically change to keep a reasonable value. As your experience grows you will then explore Av and Tv depending on what you are looking for in the final image.

.... or not as the case may be Smile If you are happy using the Scene modes of your camera and don't want to, or see no need to explore the varied settings and options that any modern DSLR offers then just concentrate on picking a suitable scene mode, develop good hand held technique, make sure you are focusing on the subject matter of interest with the focus points, allow the camera time to focus, and most of your shots will be 'keepers' - until you start to get picky with composition, but thats a whole new ball game Smile
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