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Anyone trying to shoot the Perseid meteor shower?
#1
We have 3 wildfires round here so the air is pretty smoky and hazy, would have to drive high into the mountains to get a clear view I think. Pity I was going to try and shoot some.

Code:
Perseid meteor shower

August 12-13, 2015 before dawn, the Perseids
The Perseid meteor shower is perhaps the most beloved meteor shower of the year for the Northern Hemisphere. Fortunately, the slender waning crescent moon rising at or near dawn will not obtrude on this year’s shower. The Perseid shower builds gradually to a peak, often produces 50 to 100 meteors per hour in a dark sky at the peak, and, for us in the Northern Hemisphere, this shower comes when the weather is warm. The Perseids tend to strengthen in number as late night deepens into midnight, and typically produce the most meteors in the wee hours before dawn. They radiate from a point in the constellation Perseus the Hero, but, as with all meteor shower radiant points, you don’t need to know Perseus to watch the shower; instead, the meteors appear in all parts of the sky. They are typically fast and bright meteors. They frequently leave persistent trains. Every year, you can look for the Perseids to peak around August 10-13. Predicted peak mornings in 2015: August 11, 12 and 13. The Perseids combine with the Delta Aquarid shower (above) to produce a dazzling display of shooting stars on what are, for us in the N. Hemisphere, warm summer nights. In 2015, as always, the Perseid meteors will be building to a peak from early August until the peak nights; afterwards, they drop off fairly rapidly. With little or no moon to ruin the show, this is a great year for watching the Perseid meteor shower.
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#2
nope. i tried to have a look last year but the only shooting stars i could see turned out to be planes from a nearby air base. there's way too much light pollution on the east coast.
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#3
(Aug 12, 2015, 21:49)EnglishBob Wrote: We have 3 wildfires round here so the air is pretty smoky and hazy, would have to drive high into the mountains to get a clear view I think. Pity I was going to try and shoot some.

Code:
Perseid meteor shower

August 12-13, 2015 before dawn, the Perseids
The Perseid meteor shower is perhaps the most beloved meteor shower of the year for the Northern Hemisphere. Fortunately, the slender waning crescent moon rising at or near dawn will not obtrude on this year’s shower. The Perseid shower builds gradually to a peak, often produces 50 to 100 meteors per hour in a dark sky at the peak, and, for us in the Northern Hemisphere, this shower comes when the weather is warm. The Perseids tend to strengthen in number as late night deepens into midnight, and typically produce the most meteors in the wee hours before dawn. They radiate from a point in the constellation Perseus the Hero, but, as with all meteor shower radiant points, you don’t need to know Perseus to watch the shower; instead, the meteors appear in all parts of the sky. They are typically fast and bright meteors. They frequently leave persistent trains. Every year, you can look for the Perseids to peak around August 10-13. Predicted peak mornings in 2015: August 11, 12 and 13. The Perseids combine with the Delta Aquarid shower (above) to produce a dazzling display of shooting stars on what are, for us in the N. Hemisphere, warm summer nights. In 2015, as always, the Perseid meteors will be building to a peak from early August until the peak nights; afterwards, they drop off fairly rapidly. With little or no moon to ruin the show, this is a great year for watching the Perseid meteor shower.

Massive cloud cover in the Cotswolds Craig, making any attempt to capture this null & void. Shame really as I was looking forward to the event.

Regards.

Phil.
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#4
We had the wildfire smoke, and typical, the wind shifted and the smoke was no longer blowing over us by the 14th... 2 days after the showers peaked.
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#5
the meteor shower seemed to have the same effect on people as a full moon, or maybe even a little worse. i work in dispatch and we had all manner of crazy call in.
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#6
    I caught something here, tho' not sure what it is!
Canon EOS 650D with 18-55 kit lens/ 75-300 zoom/ 100-400 zoom
https://www.flickr.com/photos/125137869@N08/
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