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Aperture & Shutter Speed Chart
#1
Here is an aperture and shutter speed chart as it relates to relative light exposure:

Aperture & Shutter Speed Chart

Any comments or suggestions for the forums members you would like to add?
Barbara - Life is what you make of it!
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#2
(Oct 14, 2013, 15:17)Barbara G. Wrote: Here is an aperture and shutter speed chart as it relates to relative light exposure:

Aperture & Shutter Speed Chart

Any comments or suggestions for the forums members you would like to add?

Sorry, Barbara, but that chart is really bad. The 'exposure value' numbers are meaningless at best, and misleading at worst. The EV changes by factors of 2 or the square root of 2 (1.414). When you double the exposure time, you double the EV. When you move from f2.8 to 4.0, you halve it.

A better explanation and graphics is here:
http://www.exposureguide.com/exposure.htm
Valley of the Sun, Arizona
D2Xs, D200's, D100's, LightRoom, CS-CC
2HowardsPhoto.biz
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#3
Awesome! Thanks for letting us know! We are all here learning, so appreciate the reply!
Barbara - Life is what you make of it!
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#4
I had a look at that chart as well Barbara. I'm with Wall-E on this one. I don't understand how any chart can be of use for exposure settings without considering the ISO and metering results which obviously will vary from shot to shot.

I'm sure most DSLRs if not all, have an exposure scale visible in the viewfinder that will allow you to explore shutter and aperture combinations for every conceivable situation you might meet.
Happy Shooting people!

Regards
Keith
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#5
EV, Exposure Value, appeared in the 60's, most cameras then had no exposure meter built in, external meters appeared with an EV dial. The cameras that had EV, had a locking device, keeping the Shutter Speed/Aperture together. Unlocked the coupler to set the EV number indicated on the meter scale, then, AP/SP setting was easy. Also was on cameras with built in meters. Never really caught on as it should, it was a great idea, but a lot of users never grasped it's potential. Still have several cameras that used this. Ed
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#6
(Oct 21, 2013, 09:33)EdMak Wrote: EV, Exposure Value, appeared in the 60's, most cameras then had no exposure meter built in, external meters appeared with an EV dial. The cameras that had EV, had a locking device, keeping the Shutter Speed/Aperture together. Unlocked the coupler to set the EV number indicated on the meter scale, then, AP/SP setting was easy. Also was on cameras with built in meters. Never really caught on as it should, it was a great idea, but a lot of users never grasped it's potential. Still have several cameras that used this. Ed

Ed, I so miss the built-in light meter on my old circa 1960's 35 mm Russian-built Zenit (sp)! Would sure make life a lot easier if the digital cameras had that feature. Spent hours on line trying to find something that would replace that - a hand-held external meter would be so useful. Really glad to read your comment here!!!

Liz

White-haired carriage drivers didn't get that old through luck!
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#7
(Oct 21, 2013, 10:04)LizBarnes Wrote:
(Oct 21, 2013, 09:33)EdMak Wrote: EV, Exposure Value, appeared in the 60's, most cameras then had no exposure meter built in, external meters appeared with an EV dial. The cameras that had EV, had a locking device, keeping the Shutter Speed/Aperture together. Unlocked the coupler to set the EV number indicated on the meter scale, then, AP/SP setting was easy. Also was on cameras with built in meters. Never really caught on as it should, it was a great idea, but a lot of users never grasped it's potential. Still have several cameras that used this. Ed

Ed, I so miss the built-in light meter on my old 35 mm Russian-built Zenit (sp)! Would sure make life a lot easier if the digital cameras had that feature. Spent hours on line trying to find something that would replace that - a hand-held external meter would be so useful. Really glad to read your comment here!!!

Liz

Liz;

Your comment doesn't make any sense.
EVERY digital camera has a light meter built in.
They have to, otherwise auto exposure wouldn't be possible.
The trick is to learn how to read it.
On my Nikon DSLRs, the display even approximates a match needle.
Valley of the Sun, Arizona
D2Xs, D200's, D100's, LightRoom, CS-CC
2HowardsPhoto.biz
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#8
Many thanks for that Wall-E. As a novice to photography this article is invaluable. Clear and concise. Thanks
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#9
(Oct 21, 2013, 10:15)Wall-E Wrote:
(Oct 21, 2013, 10:04)LizBarnes Wrote:
(Oct 21, 2013, 09:33)EdMak Wrote: EV, Exposure Value, appeared in the 60's, most cameras then had no exposure meter built in, external meters appeared with an EV dial. The cameras that had EV, had a locking device, keeping the Shutter Speed/Aperture together. Unlocked the coupler to set the EV number indicated on the meter scale, then, AP/SP setting was easy. Also was on cameras with built in meters. Never really caught on as it should, it was a great idea, but a lot of users never grasped it's potential. Still have several cameras that used this. Ed

Ed, I so miss the built-in light meter on my old 35 mm Russian-built Zenit (sp)! Would sure make life a lot easier if the digital cameras had that feature. Spent hours on line trying to find something that would replace that - a hand-held external meter would be so useful. Really glad to read your comment here!!!

Liz

Liz;

Your comment doesn't make any sense.
EVERY digital camera has a light meter built in.
They have to, otherwise auto exposure wouldn't be possible.
The trick is to learn how to read it.
On my Nikon DSLRs, the display even approximates a match needle.

White-haired carriage drivers didn't get that old through luck!
Reply
#10
Liz;

Your comment doesn't make any sense.
EVERY digital camera has a light meter built in.
They have to, otherwise auto exposure wouldn't be possible.
The trick is to learn how to read it.
On my Nikon DSLRs, the display even approximates a match needle.
[/quote]


Made sense to me! If I had a DSLR, maybe I could find that, ED. Since I don't have one, and the budget doesn't allow for one, guess I should just shut up here and go to strictly using the built-in modes in the wanna-be camera I do have, instead of struggling with alternate settings

Liz

White-haired carriage drivers didn't get that old through luck!
Reply
#11
(Oct 21, 2013, 10:46)LizBarnes Wrote: Liz;

Your comment doesn't make any sense.
EVERY digital camera has a light meter built in.
They have to, otherwise auto exposure wouldn't be possible.
The trick is to learn how to read it.
On my Nikon DSLRs, the display even approximates a match needle.


Made sense to me! If I had a DSLR, maybe I could find that, ED. Since I don't have one, and the budget doesn't allow for one, guess I should just shut up here and go to strictly using the built-in modes in the wanna-be camera I do have, instead of struggling with alternate settings

Liz
[/quote]

Liz;

I apologize for the tone of my reply to you.
It came across as a little harsh, and that's not the way I wanted it to be.
I don't want to discourage you (or anyone) from participating and learning about digital photography.

Welcome to ShutterTalk and I look forward to seeing more posts from you.
Valley of the Sun, Arizona
D2Xs, D200's, D100's, LightRoom, CS-CC
2HowardsPhoto.biz
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#12
You could try light metering the way I learned. Full Sun is f16 at 1 over whatever filmspeed your using. ISO100 would be 1/100 second. Add to or remove from the exposure as the brightness changes. Try to learn the difference in light level for 1 stop of exposure - or buy a light meter. I too had a Zenit but the model without a lightmeter. I still use my Weston V meter even though my camera has an excellent built in meter.
Although every camera has a built-in meter it's a case of if they'll let you see what they've measured. Lots keep it from you so you can't trouble your pretty little mind with stuff the maker thinks shouldn't concern you!
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#13
Hand held meters are readily available on Ebay and add a great deal to your use of light. For instance, it is near to impossible to take an incidence reading with the camera's built-in meter. Portraits look so much better with the camera set to manual exposure and an incidence reading taken with a hand-held meter.

Incidently, I still use a camera with EV settings on the shutter - a Voigtlander Vitomatic II - and the system works very well.
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