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Exif data
#1
How do I post the exif data on here? I have been told my photos don't show this. Could I have some help on this please. What software programme do you use. I usually shoot in raw and post in jpg. I have digital photo professional which came with my canon camera, and I have faststone image viewer. Any help is most appreicated.
Regards Jane
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#2
When you convert to jpg in DPP be sure to use the " saving to EXIF jpeg files." option.
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#3
(Apr 2, 2016, 09:52)EnglishBob Wrote: When you convert to jpg in DPP be sure to use the " saving to EXIF jpeg files." option.

Ahh - many thanks Craig.
Jane
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#4
Must admit I never save EXIF data, and never look at it in other people's photos. The photo's the thing for me - camera, lens, shutter speed, f-stop etc. is irrelevant to the viewer. Either the photo is good for you or it isn't. Agreed, if you're learning and you want to know how someone got that bokeh or that motion blur then such details are useful - but then simply ask, open up the conversation. For any other reason (i.e. non learning) why would you need it?
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#5
EXIF data is great for getting date and time of photograph. as long as the camera clock is set. I use it a lot for sequences of shots so I know in what order they were taken. It gives you the data of exposure, great for longer exposure shots (it can also explain camera shake!), and of course I always add the data to photographs posted here, as requested in the etiquette section.
Ask yourself, "What's most important for the final image?".
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#6
(Apr 2, 2016, 18:44)delb0y Wrote: Must admit I never save EXIF data, and never look at it in other people's photos. The photo's the thing for me - camera, lens, shutter speed, f-stop etc. is irrelevant to the viewer. Either the photo is good for you or it isn't. Agreed, if you're learning and you want to know how someone got that bokeh or that motion blur then such details are useful - but then simply ask, open up the conversation. For any other reason (i.e. non learning) why would you need it?

If you enter some of the competitions on this site, they ask for exif data. Also it is helpful to a beginner, as you say. I do agree with you about the photo being the whole point, either good or not.
Jane
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#7
How do you read the exif data on other people's photos? I would like to know as not everyone puts the details on and it would be useful to know. Thanks
Jane
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#8
Ahh, must admit I'd never noticed that it was part of the etiquette here. Bad me - I must go and read the guidelines. I will start including it.
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#9
Jane, right click on the pic, on Forum, then save as, save to where you wish, Desktop is easier to find!. Right click on Desktop pic, Click on Summery Tab, click on Advanced if no Info seen. Exif can be removed by editing software, or by owner. Her is one , random choice. Ed.


Attached Files Image(s)
   
To each his own!
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#10
Here's a picture linked from Flickr to which I've left the EXIF data attached. Just below the image (in Flickr) is the basic lens / camera / shutter speed / ISO / date etc etc and a link to all the (masses of) EXIF data itself.

[Image: 25932478330_cd15d94e53_z.jpg]

Here's a version that is loaded via the Shuttertalk attachment method:

   

And in this case you'd need to use Ed's method.


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#11
Derek. When you link to Flickr it doesn't display the EXIF data here. And it is not in the Etiquette section about the information. It is in the Critique guidelines. Sorry if I confused the issue.
Ask yourself, "What's most important for the final image?".
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#12
Just discovered that if you click on the Flickr image it takes you to Flickr, where the EXIF data is displayed. Love the moustache!
Ask yourself, "What's most important for the final image?".
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#13
My good friends in the local photo club and I are not beginners, but we do consider ourselves to be continuous learners. We are always keen to experience the enjoyment given by viewing good photos.

However, more than that - we are very interested in: where they were captured; in some cases (e.g. wildlife) what the subject is; how they were produced (sensor size, lens focal length, any filters used, etc.); if/how they have been processed (special techniques, software used, etc.). This helps us to progress in knowledge and understanding so that, hopefully, we can improve our own photography.

It seems to me that those principles are also the basics upon which Shuttertalk was founded. To quote from the "About" section:

"Shuttertalk has grown out of a constant obsession with photography, and the desire to share its joys with others. Our aim is to build a community of digital photographers who share a similar passion for their craft. Through the discussion forums and exhibition gallery, members can freely express their opinions, ideas and share their tips, techniques and works of art with each other.

The verb "share" appears several times in the quote. Therefore it always disappoints me when quite a number of photos are posted in the forums here without any of even the most basic information about each one (e.g. when, where, and what it is) being shared with other members.

Cheers.
Philip
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#14
I agree with all you've said there, Philip. Aside from the fact that I do consider myself a beginner. I've only been doing this a couple of years and I'm still pretty much floundering around in the darkness - quite literally on occasions.

Continuous learning is one of the most important things in life. I'm a pretty decent guitar picker (hopefully Jocko will attest to this) but I still take lessons and, as often as possible, these lessons are from some of the best players in the world. One of my photographer teachers/mentors is one of the top photographers in the country, FRPS, sits on RPS assessment panels. I prefer to spend my money on courses (on any subject, often random, such as a week's falconry course) rather than things. So, yes, I'm a massive fan of continuous learning, too.

I just worry that EXIF data becomes a substitute for discussion and that sharing that you've mentioned. Look at the last ten critique discussions - how much sharing and discussion have the images generated? I'm new here and I'm not trying to rock the boat. Every forum has it's own style and culture - but I'd hate to think someone would look at a photo, wonder on things such as camera and lens and focal length (as if those things would help them achieve a similar result), and get that info from the file rather than having a conversation about it. But I do agree - a bit more background to the pictures would be welcome, including but not restricted to the key technical data. Where, when are good - the why is more important. But maybe this is just me - composition and content are what floats my boat. I tend to look at as many art books as I do photography books, so maybe I'm just not an EXIF type of guy. Will include it going forward though.

Regards
Derek
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#15
(Apr 3, 2016, 06:10)delb0y Wrote: I'm a pretty decent guitar picker (hopefully Jocko will attest to this)
I would say "excellent" rather than "decent.
I will start adding a bit more why, where and when, to my images.
I sometimes get disappointed how little response the Critique images get. There are the, very welcome, stalwarts, who express an opinion, but many who don't say a word. Mike's "Duck Flotilla" has over 100 views but only 4 replies. Disappointing. The main reason I am here is to talk photography and learn, and the best way to learn is to listen to the advice of others, then try it out for yourself. There are world class photographers posting here. Why wouldn't I want to listen to them.
Ask yourself, "What's most important for the final image?".
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#16
The sorts of data contained in the EXIF file are the basics of making a good photograph, along with other important basics such as (in no particular order) the photographer's vision of the image, the light, the content, the composition, the image processing, plus any other basics I have forgotten to mention.

Regarding the EXIF data: although there are examples of good photographs snapped with any camera, in auto mode, by good fortune, and with little thought other than spotting a great opportunity, the appearance of the image as visualised by the photographer can often be very dependent on the selection of the lens focal length, the aperture, the shutter speed, the ISO value, the white balance, etc.

I would guess that, at least for some of us, the EXIF data also constitute some of the basic information to be considered when writing a critique or discussion post about an uploaded photo although, of course, they might not always require comment.

Cheers.
Philip
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#17
Great points made here. I am simply the grounds keeper on the forums. The members are what really makes this forum what it is.

People get so busy and they do not post much while others keep things going (discussion) which is greatly appreciated.
Barbara - Life is what you make of it!
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#18
(Apr 3, 2016, 02:36)EdMak Wrote: Jane, right click on the pic, on Forum, then save as, save to where you wish, Desktop is easier to find!. Right click on Desktop pic, Click on Summery Tab, click on Advanced if no Info seen. Exif can be removed by editing software, or by owner. Her is one , random choice. Ed.

Many thanks Ed.
Jane
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#19
(Apr 3, 2016, 02:22)snaphappy Wrote: How do you read the exif data on other people's photos? I would like to know as not everyone puts the details on and it would be useful to know. Thanks
Jane

My image browser I use ACDSee has an information pane that shows embedded exif data.

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#20
Jane. You use X8. This is the EXIF panel.

   
Ask yourself, "What's most important for the final image?".
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#21
(Apr 4, 2016, 13:06)EnglishBob Wrote:
(Apr 3, 2016, 02:22)snaphappy Wrote: How do you read the exif data on other people's photos? I would like to know as not everyone puts the details on and it would be useful to know. Thanks
Jane


My image browser I use ACDSee has an information pane that shows embedded exif data.

Thank you Craig, I will have to try that one.
Jane
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#22
(Apr 4, 2016, 13:23)Jocko Wrote: Jane. You use X8. This is the EXIF panel.

Thank you John. I know my exif data shows here, but didn't know how to see other peoples.
Regards Jane

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#23
Thank you everyone for all your replies on exif data. I have had a lot of interesting information which I am very grateful for.
what a great bunch of people on here Smile
Regards Jane
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#24
(Apr 4, 2016, 14:08)snaphappy Wrote: Thank you John. I know my exif data shows here, but didn't know how to see other peoples.
You have to download the image into X8. Provided the image in the viewing pane is the image you have downloaded then it will show the EXIF data.

Ask yourself, "What's most important for the final image?".
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#25
Jane, to download someone else's image from a forum post, click the right mouse button anywhere on the image in the post, then in the pop-up window select "Save image as" and save it where you like on your hard drive.

You can also see the EXIF data when an image is on screen in PSP X8's "Edit" window - just click on the "Image" menu and then select "Image Information" in the drop-down menu and an information window will open.

Cheers.
Philip
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