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How To Clean Your DSLR and the Lens
#1
While cleaning the DSLR and your lenses is a compulsory event if you are a photographer, you must be very careful if you are not an expert. Your camera is a delicate instrument and you can easily damage it. So be cautious. Following tips were collected from various online resources.

Cleaning the Lens

Remove your lens from the camera and place it on a stable, dust free surface. Do not place it on edges of the table. You will easily drop it and harm the lens

1.To blow the large dust particles away, use a blower.
2.Use a lens cleaning solution.
3.Wipe the lens gently after applying the lens cleaning solution.
4.If you have filters clean them using the cleaning solution.

Cleaning the Sensor

1.Lock the mirror before you do anything. ( Your camera’s owners manual contains instructions as to how to do this)
2.Use the blower to blow large dust particles away.
3.Wipe the sensor gently with a sensor cleaner
4.Dont use a lens cleaner to clean the sensor
5.Do not use a vaccum cleaner to clean your sensor.

If you are not sure how to do this properly, don’t try this. You can always get it cleaned by a trained expert, authorized by your camera manufacturer. However its important to get the camera cleaned once in a while. If you are interested in knowing more about the process you can always find many resources in the internet.
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#2
I haven't had much experience, and this is something I've always wanted to know: my Nikon D3100 has a "sensor cleaning" function each time it turns on/off. Does it actually do any good?
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#3
(Oct 12, 2012, 00:52)kNox Wrote: I haven't had much experience, and this is something I've always wanted to know: my Nikon D3100 has a "sensor cleaning" function each time it turns on/off. Does it actually do any good?

If you're constantly changing lenses it is a good idea to keep the function on. What it does is shake the sensor's first layer to take the dust off. Some resilient dust may hang on, but most off the times it is effective.
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#4
I do change lenses quite often, so it's a good idea I've kept this option on. I think I have *some* dust on the sensor, in some photos I can see a slight trace no more than a couple of pixels wide. I think I might have to dust it off myself.
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#5
Most photographers I know don't bother that much about dust on the sensor. Neither do I. I don't bother to clean it because it is too easy to clean in post processing (one click with the spot healing tool), it only shows up in areas like the sky, and I am still hoping it will eventually fall off on its own. Big Grin
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#6
I tried to clean my lense myself and now I have spots. The nearest place that lceans cameras is 2 hours away and $60. $60!?!?! Does that sound right? Sounds like highway robbery!
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#7
(Oct 21, 2012, 10:14)BrandyMaeD Wrote: I tried to clean my lense myself and now I have spots. The nearest place that lceans cameras is 2 hours away and $60. $60!?!?! Does that sound right? Sounds like highway robbery!

I would have another go at cleaning the lens. Make sure you have a good microfibre cleaning cloth and go easy on the cleaning solution. It works for me although sometimes I do have to repeat the operation and persevere with the cleaning cloth. Lastly I would recommend using a UV filter to protect the lens glass and minimize dust contamination. Good luck ...
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#8
Spots are rarely caused by dirt on the lens, usually caused by dust on the sensor.
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#9
BrandyMaeD If you send it away, find a few reviews of where you are sending it.
I sent my Canon to a Canon authorised agent (from Canons website) It came back as bad as it went. After complaining they said send it back again. I said will you pay postage and packing. OK they said. It came back the second time with the glass led screen broken. ( could have been the carriers fault ) Of course it went back again at their expense and came back with a plastic screen. But they had not told me this and now it is scuffed a little under the now applied screensaver. It would have gone back again if I had a spare to use.
Lumix LX5.
Canon 350 D.+ 18-55 Kit lens + Tamron 70-300 macro. + Canon 50mm f1.8 + Manfrotto tripod, in bag.
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#10
(Oct 24, 2012, 18:51)NT73 Wrote: BrandyMaeD If you send it away, find a few reviews of where you are sending it.
I sent my Canon to a Canon authorised agent (from Canons website) It came back as bad as it went. After complaining they said send it back again. I said will you pay postage and packing. OK they said. It came back the second time with the glass led screen broken. ( could have been the carriers fault ) Of course it went back again at their expense and came back with a plastic screen. But they had not told me this and now it is scuffed a little under the now applied screensaver. It would have gone back again if I had a spare to use.

OH WOW!!!! That sounds like a nightmare! After reading that I think I will give it another shot myself...
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