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How to re-size the image?
#26
Always best to set your camera to the highest resolution and save your images in the highest resolution you can. Memory is cheap. You never know when you will want to print off that A2 poster. Make a copy and reduce image size for sending by email, entering competitions, or posting on this forum.
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#27
(Aug 18, 2013, 09:04)Dean Wrote: Always best to set your camera to the highest resolution and save your images in the highest resolution you can. Memory is cheap. You never know when you will want to print off that A2 poster. Make a copy and reduce image size for sending by email, entering competitions, or posting on this forum.

How do you resize and keep the original at it's size?
Eli
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#28
(Aug 18, 2013, 10:50)Eli Ho Wrote:
(Aug 18, 2013, 09:04)Dean Wrote: Always best to set your camera to the highest resolution and save your images in the highest resolution you can. Memory is cheap. You never know when you will want to print off that A2 poster. Make a copy and reduce image size for sending by email, entering competitions, or posting on this forum.

How do you resize and keep the original at it's size?
Eli
You should always keep your original image as it left the camera. Open it in your photo editor, do whatever turns you on there and then save with a different file name. I usually incorporate the original file name, such as IMG_1687 poppy. Some people will save the copy first, before applying photoshop, so they don’t inadvertently save it with the original file name and lose the original. If I tried different photoshop variations then I would go back to the original image, make the changes and then save as IMG_1687 poppy B&W, for instance. Then if I want to resize to attach to an email, or load on facebook, I would make the necessary changes to the image and save it as IMG_1687 poppy B&Wa. That way I will always know where the image started life and can go back to the original if I want to. That’s the theory, anyway. If you look at the images that I have posted on this forum you will probably find that I just called it “poppy”.
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#29
Image Resizer, Windows Power Tools, just a right Click is needed. Ed.

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-GB/windo...=powertoys
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#30
(Aug 17, 2013, 23:09)Eli Ho Wrote:
(Aug 12, 2013, 17:38)Eli Ho Wrote:
(Aug 12, 2013, 16:39)Wall-E Wrote:
(Aug 5, 2013, 18:03)Eli Ho Wrote: Being a newbee and all that has been said, I need to ask a few basic questions.
When resizing is used, is it a reduction in the size of the finale print or is it reduction of the pictels. I shoot in raw and jpeg because I don't know what the end result will be. I know, in time I will understand, however, in the very beginning, I am confused with the terminology.
Thanks Wall-E. I am begining to understand. If I use a Nikon D-3000 and shoot in raw to prepair for the best post processing, and I want to make a print at 8x11 and later want a 16x20, is the resolutation going to be good and if not how would I increase the size and achive good resolutation? Eli
Print size is not 'directly' related to the number of pixels (not pictels).

Most printers have ratings of 200-300 DPI (dots per inch).
So, for a 640x480 PIXEL image, a good quality print can be had up to about 3.5" x 2.4".
You COULD print bigger, but the print quality would go down.

Resizing that image to, say, 320x240, would make it so GOOD prints would only be 1.6" x 1.2".

Remember that the image size (in pixels) divided by the DPI of the printer only gives you the MAXIMUM size for a maximum resolution print. You can print smaller than that with no problems.

Wall-E
I am assumeing, when using the largest number of "pixels" that will take up much more space on ones camera and computer and when processing, you can reduce that number to make smaller prints, however, what if you wanted a smaller print and wanted to keep the size. Another thought, what if you wanted to share the pic and keep the size. Can you go back to original size, once you have reduced the size and sent the pic?

Yes, higher resolution takes more 'space' (memory). MEMORY IS CHEAP.

NEVER reduce the size of your original or ONLY copy of an image.
Make a backup of ALL images to a storage media OUTSIDE your computer before you start working on them. And I do mean ALL! Some go as far as making 2 backups. External hard drives, CD/DVD's..............
I use Lightroom and Picasa. Both of these can EXPORT smaller versions of the original, without changing the original file size.
Don't understand what you mean by "share the pic and keep the size."
You can export versions of your image with any (or no) reduction in size.

What software are you using? (Picasa is FREE!!)
Valley of the Sun, Arizona
D2Xs, D200's, D100's, LightRoom, CS-CC
2HowardsPhoto.biz
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