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May I ask something?
#1
Hi, maybe you know, I am not a photographer like you all. But I love photography and I try to take some pictures, especially when something hits me strongly and poetically. Yes, I can't be without poetical touches... Maybe you may ask what means this poetical touches, can it be right if I say much more artistic and much more philosophical and makes everything much more meaningful... something like that. Sorry for my language too. Anyway, at last I have a new camera and it is again Canon. Canon EOS 500D. It is very new actually after 450D... before this one I was using again Canon A720... So it is a little bit different now for me. My point that I would like to learn from you, should I go to a course for digital photo? Can I learn how to take a better picture by myself and by reading on something on internet? Can you help me about this. Of course, I try to keep reading and watching all your works too. Once I had a course but it was an old camera and manual... It has been many years ago. Then I had after all, digital cameras but not like this new one. Seems much complicated. Anyway just I need to know what should I do? I read also Canon web site.

Thank you, love, nia
“There are no rules for good photographs, there are only good photographs.”

Ansel Adams



#2
Hi Nia Smile
Firstly read through your camera's manual just to know what features are available, and then play around with the camera to try them all out - so you know what your camera is capable of (and what it may not be capable of). Learn your camera, know how to operate it, so you can make it do what you want.
Then use your camera as much as you can, take many photos and learn from it Big Grin
#3
Thank you Adam, I will listen. I am also reading the camera's manual too, and today I took some pictures but to be honest I don't know what I did exactly, just I try to learn and to explore, maybe later I can say the details too, but it is so enjoyable. I love photography. I should say my thanks firstly to my dear poet friend Don that he introduced this site to me and then many thanks for you all because of your works that was a great exciting to take photo as you Smile Maybe one day.

Have a nice weekend and have a nice shots,
with my love,
nia
“There are no rules for good photographs, there are only good photographs.”

Ansel Adams



#4
nia, I would give a different advice to that of Adam. There are some basic concepts that you need to know to become creative photographer. You need to understand concept of exposure and how apperture and shutterspeed together define exposure, you need to understand depth of field, understand how focal length affects not only how close objects appear, but how focal length affect perspective and basics like that. Next you need to learn basics about composition. Eventualy if you become serious, you will need to learn a bit about postprocessing. There is a lot of basic information available on the internet for free or you can buy a book. College courses are also a good place to start. How you go about it depends how you best learn. Some people prefer courses, others books. You can also learn a lot by doing and this is in fact probably the most effective once you are more advanced, but at the begining, I would have somebody to teach me basics.

Take care and good luck

Pavel
Please see my photos at http://mullerpavel.smugmug.com (fewer, better image quality, not updated lately)
or at http://www.flickr.com/photos/pavel_photophile2008/ (all photos)
#5
Hi Pavel, thank you for your advice, this is so nice. I'll keep them too in my mind. I have already begun to read some articles about these important technical concepts. It seems such a nice learning period for me, also I try to practice and to learn my new camera. A few years ago actually I attended a photography lesson, but it was not about this new technology. Seems that as if I missed so many things... Thank you once again, you are so nice. I hope I can do this well.

with my love,
nia
“There are no rules for good photographs, there are only good photographs.”

Ansel Adams



#6
I like that you have a clear goal of "poetical touches" for your photographs.
This makes perfect sense to me, and is a great way to approach taking pictures.
Of course, this can be accomplished in many ways from simply seeing the potential of a particular scene to plain dumb luck, and everything in-between.

I would advise that you keep your camera in fully automatic mode most of the time to catch the sudden and amazing things that unfold around you as quickly as possible, but to also explore the other modes where you have to choose settings for artistic or technical reasons whenever you have spare time.
It won't take much experimentation before you learn the relationships between shutter speed and aperture, and how ISO settings can help you balance those factors with real-world light levels, especially indoors.
I would suggest that you pay particular attention to learning about your camera's exposure metering system and it's onscreen and viewfinder displays when using Manual mode. When you fully understand how to view and use this feature it will help you more than anything else, allowing you to make direct comparisons between various aperture and shutter combinations under all kinds of different situations.
#7
KeithAlanK Wrote:I like that you have a clear goal of "poetical touches" for your photographs.
This makes perfect sense to me, and is a great way to approach taking pictures.
Of course, this can be accomplished in many ways from simply seeing the potential of a particular scene to plain dumb luck, and everything in-between.

I would advise that you keep your camera in fully automatic mode most of the time to catch the sudden and amazing things that unfold around you as quickly as possible, but to also explore the other modes where you have to choose settings for artistic or technical reasons whenever you have spare time.
It won't take much experimentation before you learn the relationships between shutter speed and aperture, and how ISO settings can help you balance those factors with real-world light levels, especially indoors.
I would suggest that you pay particular attention to learning about your camera's exposure metering system and it's onscreen and viewfinder displays when using Manual mode. When you fully understand how to view and use this feature it will help you more than anything else, allowing you to make direct comparisons between various aperture and shutter combinations under all kinds of different situations.
Thank you KeithAlanK, how precious your words, I'll remember them always. And yes, you are so right I need to learn my new camera, and all about these shutter speed and aperture and ISO settings too... I don't know now, did you see my last photos (that were taken indoors with my new camera), they were my first experience with my new camera. I would like to know your thoughts too.

Thank you again, I am so happy to be here with you all, photography is another field that feeds my poetical spirit and yes my soul too Smile

Have a nice day,
with my love,
nia
“There are no rules for good photographs, there are only good photographs.”

Ansel Adams



  


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