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Model/ property release forms.
#1

I'm really confused on when do I need a release form.
Do I need a model release just for photographings somebodys hands? and even my owns?
And what about public spaces, can I photograph a public building and sell the work without a property release?

Thanks
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#2
Daniel, showing Europe as Location, makes it problematical, to attempt an answer. Laws probably are different a bit, by area. I'm in Scotland, and in all my 51 years as a Pro, never had anybody sign a release or similar. As for buildings, used to produce Local View Postcards. Others may have a different outlook/experience. Cheers. Ed.
To each his own!
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#3
Daniel,

I'm pretty sure that if you go on to one of the professional representative bodies websites, somewhere on that site, it will hold the data you are looking for. It is of course up to you to decide which site to go to. Also, as Ed has pointed out, the laws regarding release forms can be different in each EU country, as indeed it can be in 'any' country world wide.

One thing to be aware of, is with current terrorist activities going on, people can get somewhat 'twitchy' about having photographs taken of their properties. If I remember correctly, as long as you are taking the picture from a public place. IE, standing on the public highway, pavement, bridge etc, you can pretty much take a photograph of anything, apart from government buildings, and be within the law in this country (England), some people might not like it, but, you're OK from a legal standpoint. I'm NOT a lawyer but that is how I remember it. The one thing you cannot take pictures of in public places is children, that is a definite no-no for obvious reasons, one of which is public paranoia, the same applies (paranoia) to the the government buildings bit. Oh and it seems the same applies to coppers, so yet more paranoia. Smile

As I said above, look into it and if you feel the need, get some advice from one of the professional bodies.

Best regards.

Phil.
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#4
Thanks a lot Ed and Phil, great advice from both!
Cheers
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#5
Shutterstock has a pretty thorough list in their contributors section of their website of public buildings that are visually copyrighted and explanations of situations where you might need a signed release
A good resource for information not only for stock photography, and if you have a thick skin there is a pretty good critique section with most reviews from people (pro and amateur) who have no other motive than to see you succeed, although they can seem a bit harsh at times. Quite often they offer invaluable suggestions on improving your efforts, technique, settings, etc
http://submit.shutterstock.com/forum/
Vincent
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#6
(Nov 3, 2014, 08:42)vincentvictor@shaw.ca Wrote: Shutterstock has a pretty thorough list in their contributors section of their website of public buildings that are visually copyrighted and explanations of situations where you might need a signed release
A good resource for information not only for stock photography, and if you have a thick skin there is a pretty good critique section with most reviews from people (pro and amateur) who have no other motive than to see you succeed, although they can seem a bit harsh at times. Quite often they offer invaluable suggestions on improving your efforts, technique, settings, etc
http://submit.shutterstock.com/forum/
Vincent

I have a lot of stock photography accounts and shutterstock is by far the most difficult to get an account, they refuse photos based on composition settings or focus points wich are completly non-sense and subjective. But maybe its a good source of information I will take a look!
Thanks
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#7
(Nov 3, 2014, 23:01)Daniel_Champion Wrote:
(Nov 3, 2014, 08:42)vincentvictor@shaw.ca Wrote: Shutterstock has a pretty thorough list in their contributors section of their website of public buildings that are visually copyrighted and explanations of situations where you might need a signed release
A good resource for information not only for stock photography, and if you have a thick skin there is a pretty good critique section with most reviews from people (pro and amateur) who have no other motive than to see you succeed, although they can seem a bit harsh at times. Quite often they offer invaluable suggestions on improving your efforts, technique, settings, etc
http://submit.shutterstock.com/forum/
Vincent


I have a lot of stock photography accounts and shutterstock is by far the most difficult to get an account, they refuse photos based on composition settings or focus points wich are completly non-sense and subjective. But maybe its a good source of information I will take a look!
Thanks
Tough to get in, and I do know what you mean, it's hard to defend their screening practices when the reviewers are rejecting one photo one month then accepting the exact same photo with literally no changes to it the next month, but do check out the resources and the advice from the guys on the forum


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