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Nikon Digital Flashes
#1
gd pointed something out to me regarding Nikon flashes and their compatibility with DSLRs. It appears that the only flash that is compatible with the D70 is the SB-800 which is almost 900 aussie buckerooos. This is becaues the D70 uses I-TTL whereas all the older flashguns use D-TTL.

I'm thinking -- that's a bit steep for Nikon users isn't it?

With Canon, I believe their DSLRs are compatible with all the speedlights from the very bottom of the range $200-one up to their flagship version.

Surely this must be an oversight on Nikon's part?
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#2
Nope - not true.

All the Nikon speedlights are compatible with the D70 (and most other Nikon bodies newer than 1990). A D70 using a combination of SB-600 or SB-800 speedlights can make use of Nikon's Advanced Lighting functionality wherein the camera can automatically balance the output of multiple flashes at different room positions wirelessly without the photographer having to exposure compensate in any way. Earlier bodies cannot use this functionality.

I use a SB-800 with my F100 - and it works just fine - but an SB-23 would have worked as well (well - not as well - but it would have worked).

This is a huge difference from saying that only the SB-800 is compatible with the D70. All Nikon speedlights will work with the D70. Newer digital bodies can make use of this superb Advance Lighting functionality.
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#3
yeah... I have / had the SB50-DX and was disappointed that basically it only fired at one output... I felt that for 500 AUD I could have got something that actually did something more than that.. but I guess it's a welcome to photography for GD.

I've now upgraded to the 800... I think it'll be *better* for what I wanna do Smile

I think the 50-DX makes an excellent slave though...

I, like Toad, am looking to use the really cool features that this flash presents.
Camera: Nikon D70
Level: Eager Amateur
Area of speciality: Sceneries
Area of Learning: Portraiture
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#4
Yeah - I was considering buying 50s as slave flashes but now I have broken down and bought slaved studio strobes with umbrellas, soft box, etc. It is actually more economical if you don't already own the other flashes, and provides greater flexibilioty for protraits, weddings etc..
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#5
Toad Wrote:Nope - not true.

All the Nikon speedlights are compatible with the D70 (and most other Nikon bodies newer than 1990). A D70 using a combination of SB-600 or SB-800 speedlights can make use of Nikon's Advanced Lighting functionality wherein the camera can automatically balance the output of multiple flashes at different room positions wirelessly without the photographer having to exposure compensate in any way. Earlier bodies cannot use this functionality.

I use a SB-800 with my F100 - and it works just fine - but an SB-23 would have worked as well (well - not as well - but it would have worked).

This is a huge difference from saying that only the SB-800 is compatible with the D70. All Nikon speedlights will work with the D70. Newer digital bodies can make use of this superb Advance Lighting functionality.

Hm... thanks for the insight Toad. I was basing my statements on this thread in rec.photo.digital - perhaps they're just talking about TTL functionality.
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#6
I see why you thought that! Smile

The first poster in the thread is incorrect in his statement - the later posters set him straight.
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#7
so Toad, in the goodness of time, you would recommend to someone who sees a future in the portrait side of things not to worry necessarily about slave flashes and just set things up right from the beginning with the umbrellas etc.

For me, this is a while off... I gotta make sure I actually get people in the shot first before I think this way.. but as part of setting up something useable long term, the way you have it now is the way you'd keep it?

My sb-800 better be the flash I think it is!!!! Smile
Camera: Nikon D70
Level: Eager Amateur
Area of speciality: Sceneries
Area of Learning: Portraiture
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#8
You can always setup your flashes on stands with with choices of umbrellas and softboxes, the power on the bigger flash units like the 800 works reasonably well for couples or individual portraits if you have a few of them.

I did the same thing on the Canon side with 2 x 550EX's and a 420 EX, the softbox and adapter ring was under $150 US.
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#9
[The warning that should be in my signature]Sorry for noob questions but is TTL a rating or something?

And Studio strobes, do they use the same function as the slave flashes to trigger? (I am not even sure how the slave flashes are triggered but ah well, at least I know (if the question is answered) that is the camera supports a slave flash OIt will support a studio flash.
Gear:
3 x GoPro Cameras
1 x Canon S100
1 x Nikon D5100
1 x Sony DSC-TX10
Apple MacBook Pro 15" (Retina Display)

"What do you want to pack today?"
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#10
I'm going to test my knowledge and then have people change it around on me so I learn.. but basically as I understand TTL, it is Through-The-Lens. So in terms of the flash, the exposure is adjusted when the shutter release is depressed such that the amount of flash-light needed to expose the scene correctly is fired.

On the 50DX which started all this, it didn't support the TTL way of life and only fired the flash at manual or full output ....

And my slaves (or the ones I'll buy from the Romans.. I mean, camera dealers) are fired wirelessly by sensing the light of the flash (either infra-red if you don't want a front fired flash in the shot) or by the front fire (or master) flash.

how'd I do for a guy who a week and a half ago did a friend's wedding reception with his on board little flash!!!
Camera: Nikon D70
Level: Eager Amateur
Area of speciality: Sceneries
Area of Learning: Portraiture
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#11
Your understanding of TTL is pretty accurate (not that I am an expert in lighting - I am just getting setup myself).

Slave flashes detect light from the master flash (remember to turn preflash off) with a light sensor and then fire simultaneously. Sometimes you need to buy a separate trigger to make your flash work this way - if you are planning to go this route - check the slave trigger requirments of your flash out before you buy.

Studio strobes in the lower powers 100-200 watts/sec tend to be cheaper than flashes, and are adequate for individuals and small groups - initially you would want a 3 light setup - key light, fill light and rim light - my setup is my SB-800 and 2 strobes (slave triggers built in).

The 2 strobes with stands, 1 softbox, 1 umbrella, 1 set of barn doors, 1 snoot, 1 honeycomb, and a carrying case came to about $500 Cdn - which is much cheaper than buying flashes. The strobes have modeling lights, and adjustable power levels. This setup should be adequate for the amount of portraiture and product shooting that I currently do, and can be upgraded on a piece by piece basis if the need arises.

If I had other speedlights, I would have used them instead of one or more of the strobes. When I priced it out, there was no advantage to using speedlights for your secondary lights if you don't already own them. You still need the stands, umbrellas etc. to setup formal studio lighting whether you use flashes or strobes.

If I was using a D70 - I might have gone with an SB-600 for the fill light and a standard continuous light (not a strobe) for the rim light. That would have allowed me to use the full functionality of the speedlights at a "reasonable" cost.
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#12
that sounds like a pretty quick way to set up a studio.. which is cool.

Okay, so I have only 1 question... in 5 parts:

what is:
a) rim light
b) barn doors
c) soft box
d) snoot
e) honeycomb

okay I lied, it's 2 questions...
and how/why would I use each of them?

of course... y'know.. I know what all these are, I'm just testing that you do Smile

As I'm just getting into this type of setup I don't really know what exists and what doesn't.. so this type of insight on this thread has helped a lot...
Camera: Nikon D70
Level: Eager Amateur
Area of speciality: Sceneries
Area of Learning: Portraiture
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#13
a) the light around the outer rim of a basketball hoop
b) how the cows get into the barn
c) a cardboard box left in the rain
d) something you do with snuff
e) a delicious bee flavoured candy

Sheesh, I thought all those were obvious!
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#14
so... what you're saying is... if I get some wet cardboard, some cows and some candy... I too can be a photographer? Smile
Camera: Nikon D70
Level: Eager Amateur
Area of speciality: Sceneries
Area of Learning: Portraiture
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#15
Worked for me... Big Grin
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#16
Or a damp, toothless hobo farmer which would be rather odd Smile

I love honeycombs though they're great to play with, unfortunately when it comes to photography its a bit like boats, at the word "marine" to anything and it doubles the price the same goes with photography gear. I'd hate to be a marine photographer I'd constantly be broke.
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#17
ok ok ok... so what are those things... and why do I want em?
Cos I'm fully prepared to mortgage my (and my girlfriend's) financial future getting all the gear I can.

At least, I've been told to do that by a few grizzled professionals.

Marine photography eh?.... I would like to subscribe to your newsletter or informational video. Smile
Camera: Nikon D70
Level: Eager Amateur
Area of speciality: Sceneries
Area of Learning: Portraiture
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#18
Rim Light - Basically creates a rim around your subject seperating it from the background, I like rim lighting directly behind the subject that spills over much like you see when you can see a glow behind their hair.

Barn Doors - Much like what you see on stage lighting, one or two sets of panels that open and close to control your lighting direction and spill.

Soft Box - A large rectangular panel with a hole in the back to poke your light through, covered in a single or double layer of diffusing white material, they also come in different shapes and sizes such as the strip light I use, it gives a very soft light hence the "soft" part of the name.

Snoot - Erm a cone shaped device that mounts on the front of the light, you can alter the level of effect it has, basically a fairly clean spot, used in combo with honeycombs and other grids for hairlights

Honeycomb - Mentioned above, named for the shape of the cells that affect the lighting, its primarily used to give harder light with interesting shadows, combined with different angular grids it can give some quite speccy results.

Hope that helps, time for lunch then I'm off to the Hot Rod show to shoot some cars before the people turn up tomorrow.

Ciao!
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#19
thanks for that, sounds like there are a lot of things that each have their place in portrait photos... thanks!

hmmm... and here I am working like a sucker when you're off doing that.

if only I had my wet cardboard and cows.. then you'd see!
Camera: Nikon D70
Level: Eager Amateur
Area of speciality: Sceneries
Area of Learning: Portraiture
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