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Problems with Windows 10 Home
#1
Hello,
I wonder if anyone can help me. I am having problems viewing my photos full screen in windows 10. I have been able to view my photos, both on my laptop and on my tv in full screen mode,but after the latest updates I now have a wide border on each side. They look more square shaped than landscape. I have tried adjusting the screen resolution and also tried different photo apps (Photos, Photo Gallery, Windows Photo Viewer), but they all show my photos in the same size. How can I get it back to full screen mode?

With regards
Jane
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#2
I normally use ACDSee 19 for my sorting and viewing. I have used ACDSee for years. I had a look at the Photo App in Windows, and it doesn't seem to have a full screen option. I did a bit of Googling and found a great, free, program called FastStone Image Viewer 5.5. I downloaded it here, and it works fine under Windows 10 Home.
Ask yourself, "What's most important for the final image?".
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#3
(Feb 4, 2016, 10:28)Jocko Wrote: I normally use ACDSee 19 for my sorting and viewing. I have used ACDSee for years. I had a look at the Photo App in Windows, and it doesn't seem to have a full screen option. I did a bit of Googling and found a great, free, program called FastStone Image Viewer 5.5. I downloaded it here, and it works fine under Windows 10 Home.

Thank you John, I have downloaded faststone and will give it a go. Don't know what the problem is as everything was fine until I got the Windows 10 Update.
Jane

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#4
Hello Jane,

I'm with Jocko - W10 viewer is functional but basic.I have used Fastone viewer for years. Not only is it good for jpgs but raw viewing also (just set up in preferences if you want default raw viewer to be FSV.)

Additionally it has first class basic editing.

I have 3 photo clssifications - good stuff, snapshots, and delete (my classification!) I've used Photoshop for years and am very happy with it when I want to do something extensive or want to work with the 'good stuff'. However for snapshots FSV is fast, and has excellent basic (and in some cases not so basic) editing. For example if you have a high contrast image such as a night time street scene or strong sunlight/ shadow photo click [ctrl] T. On one adjustment screen I can increase shadow exposure, reduce highlights, tickle the contrast if needed, then up the saturation, all in a few seconds with 4 sliders.

The only issue I've found is when viewing a lot of raw images - it sometimes seems to get 'stuck' on the current image. Easy to overcome - just push the mouse cursor to top of screen and a filmstrip opens which you can scroll along easily with the L & R arrow keys or mouse.

if like me you are a smidge impatient to read the user guide, mouse to the left of the screen for adjustments, top for filmstrip, right for file info.

Dave



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#5
(Feb 6, 2016, 06:52)dave1712 Wrote: Hello Jane,

I'm with Jocko - W10 viewer is functional but basic.I have used Fastone viewer for years. Not only is it good for jpgs but raw viewing also (just set up in preferences if you want default raw viewer to be FSV.)

Additionally it has first class basic editing.

I have 3 photo clssifications - good stuff, snapshots, and delete (my classification!) I've used Photoshop for years and am very happy with it when I want to do something extensive or want to work with the 'good stuff'. However for snapshots FSV is fast, and has excellent basic (and in some cases not so basic) editing. For example if you have a high contrast image such as a night time street scene or strong sunlight/ shadow photo click [ctrl] T. On one adjustment screen I can increase shadow exposure, reduce highlights, tickle the contrast if needed, then up the saturation, all in a few seconds with 4 sliders.

The only issue I've found is when viewing a lot of raw images - it sometimes seems to get 'stuck' on the current image. Easy to overcome - just push the mouse cursor to top of screen and a filmstrip opens which you can scroll along easily with the L & R arrow keys or mouse.

if like me you are a smidge impatient to read the user guide, mouse to the left of the screen for adjustments, top for filmstrip, right for file info.

Dave


Thanks for all the tips Dave. I must admit I don't always read all the guides first, only when I get stuck. I tend to shoot in raw and then convert to jpg, finding this easier for adjustments.
Jane
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#6
Win 10, Windows Photo Viewer, should do what you want. Ed.
To each his own!
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