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Question on camera shots
#1
I have the Nikon Coolpix, P600 fixed lens -- I take a lot of closeups using autofocus to get really fine definition, color, and unusual tiny effects. Instead of using the zoom, I practically lay the camera down on the flowers and things to do this. I have to take lots of shots to get one perfect, or close to perfect as I see it. What I get a lot of is perfect background and blurred subject, and it is never consistent. I do get the shot, i.e., perfect subject, and blurred background,but it takes several to get it. I've used other settings such as "scene" and then within that closeup, or, flower, etc. It doesn't do as good as autofocus. And, I've stood back and used the zoom, and it doesn't do as well as laying the camera down right on the subject. I use the zoom for distance, which works great, but, at only two or three feet, not so good. Anyway, what am I doing wrong?
#2
When your camera is very close to the subject, or when using a powerful zoom setting, the depth of field (the distance in sharp focus from front to back) is very very short - measurable in only millimetres or even less! So after the shutter button is half-pressed to focus on the subject, a tiny movement of the camera, forwards or backwards, or e.g. a gentle breeze moving a flower, will put the subject out of focus just as you complete the shutter press. To give themselves a better chance of success, many photographers fix the camera in position by using a tripod, or by resting it on something firm, when taking these very close shots. The depth of field can be increased by setting the camera lens to a small aperture (large f number), but that will reduce the shutter speed to get the correct exposure, making it even more important that the camera can't move during the shot. Do remember also that if your camera gets too close to the subject, it cannot focus the lens on it at all, and only some things further away will be sharp!

Cheers.
Philip
#3
When you are close to it, are you setting Macro. on the Camera. Personally, I would not use Digital Zoom. Try different ISO Settings, up to 800. I would also deactivate D Lighting, if it is on. Try Continuous Focus, if using Tripod, turn of Vibration Reduction. If Image Sharpening is activated, turn it off. Ed.
To each his own!
#4
The other thing to watch is that you are not inside the minimum focusing distance for the focal distance and mode you are using. With your camera at it's widest setting in Macro mode, you can be almost touching the subject, 1/5th of an inch. With the lens set to a longer mm , you have to be further back.
#5
Would have expected some form of indication, if outside the camera parameters?? Ed.
To each his own!
#6
Thanks!

(Apr 16, 2015, 06:09)MrB Wrote: When your camera is very close to the subject, or when using a powerful zoom setting, the depth of field (the distance in sharp focus from front to back) is very very short - measurable in only millimetres or even less! So after the shutter button is half-pressed to focus on the subject, a tiny movement of the camera, forwards or backwards, or e.g. a gentle breeze moving a flower, will put the subject out of focus just as you complete the shutter press. To give themselves a better chance of success, many photographers fix the camera in position by using a tripod, or by resting it on something firm, when taking these very close shots. The depth of field can be increased by setting the camera lens to a small aperture (large f number), but that will reduce the shutter speed to get the correct exposure, making it even more important that the camera can't move during the shot. Do remember also that if your camera gets too close to the subject, it cannot focus the lens on it at all, and only some things further away will be sharp!

Cheers.
Philip

#7
Thanks all for the help. I have copied all your comments, and will adapt and study them. I'm just making one answer here...........Again, thanks.
#8
(Apr 16, 2015, 13:43)EdMak Wrote: Would have expected some form of indication, if outside the camera parameters?? Ed.

Not sure about that particular camera, the only indicaton on any of mine is a failure to focus.
#9
And the shutter works when it is not in focus? Ed.
To each his own!
#10
Depends on the shooting mode, but yes it will.
#11
I meant on Autofocus. Ed.
To each his own!
  


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