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Street Photography
#26
Excellent. I would never have thought of using Transform. I just took a couple of inches off the photographer's left leg. and squared entire image up. Thanks for the tip.
Ask yourself, "What's most important for the final image?".
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#27
That looks better, Ed. I would guess that the adjustment has skewed the image, straightening the lamp-post while maintaining the correct line of the water.

Cheers.
Philip
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#28
Very good images, Graham (although for me the first could be even better if straightened), and thank you for clarifying the different but related genres.

Cheers.
Philip
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#29
(Jan 4, 2016, 17:55)MrB Wrote: Is the image showing a scene with a wide river or a narrow lake? Either way, it looks as though it could be described as well-saturated, Jeff.

Cheers.
Philip

This is the river Severn slightly in flood at Worcester Bridge. When the river floods the swans tend to swim up and down the road as you see here...its a swan sanctuary and they have feeders who tend to them daily and many fans and spectators - as here...

Cheers, Jeff

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#30
Philip. P/S is very impressive in this situation, had to read up, to understand the many alternatives. Your description is accurate.
Non straight verticals always reminds me of the first time I was let loose to take a pic, local library, 10x8 camera, under the cloth, grid lines on the screen, rise and tilt front, no excuses. Took me about an hour in the darkroom to get all (virtually) straight, paper easel propped up unevenly to compensate for my mistakes, 4/5 sheets of paper, a disaster, to get a properly exposed print. Final print satisfactory, then I did not have the sense to copy it, in case we had repeat orders, which we did get. My then boss, did not tell me to do this, he came back at night and did it, taught me a few lessons, never made the same error again. Happy days. Ed.
To each his own!
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#31
Graham - that's one super tutorial, thanks. How would you describe this shot of a child in Yucay area.

Ed I will have a go at that and let you know how I get on.

Jeff


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#32
Not sure why a small image appeared...
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#33
Jeff, to me that's a portrait. Outdoors with natural light, and probably a candid shot, but a portrait nonetheless. For it to be a street shot, we would have to see what the child is looking at, or have some other inter-action visible in the scene.

Nice shot all the same. Bravo!
GrahamS
Take my advice.  I'm not using it.Wink

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#34
Aha! How interesting...to be continued I think...I'm liking this...Jeff

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#35
A lot of people HATE street photography. I used to do a fair bit of it when I lived in Winnipeg (here there is nothing going on in the streets). I was actually nearly banned from my local photography club because I was taking pictures of people on the street (mostly out of a bus window). Although strictly legal for us non-professionals who make no money, a lot of people think its immoral. Many are afraid the photographer is some kind of pervert, especially if a child is anywhere near the field of vision of the camera. Has anybody had that kind of experience.

[Image: girlnearsunSM.jpg]
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[Image: staggerSM.jpg]
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Winnipeg, Canada February 2010
Nikon D3100 with Tokina 28-70mm f3.5, (I like to use a Vivitar .43x aux on the 28-70mm Tokina), Nikkor 10.5 mm fisheye, Quanteray 70-300mm f4.5, ProOptic 500 mm f6.3 mirror lens. http://donschaefferphoto.blogspot.com/
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#36
Hi Don Goodness me that doesn't sound too good but I like your shots anyway. I suppose there is always one, but overall I've had a great deal of fun talking to people in the street in various countries and then snapping them though we have just learned that isn't street photography pure and simple but street portraiture. Can't remember anyone saying no, though a few want to know what will be done with the photo. But I find communities differ - in some places people much more open, even eager, to have their photograph taken than in other places. As to pure street, people are sensitive sometimes and so far I tend to forego the shot rather than risk offence but not always. A long zoom works well. All the best Jeff


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#37
Hi Graham

Could this be street? It's candid, people doing something and with a humorous sub plot...(not a new shot by the way and Ed was not impressed on grounds of hygiene but it is life in the raw!) Or does street have to be western urban?

Cheers

Jeff


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#38
I never asked I just shot the picture. You can't get a real photograph of ongoing life if you ask. People tend to pose. Although this is legal, a lot of photographers and others didn't like it.
Nikon D3100 with Tokina 28-70mm f3.5, (I like to use a Vivitar .43x aux on the 28-70mm Tokina), Nikkor 10.5 mm fisheye, Quanteray 70-300mm f4.5, ProOptic 500 mm f6.3 mirror lens. http://donschaefferphoto.blogspot.com/
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#39
Don How long ago was that? Have photographers changed in their perceptions perhaps? Jeff
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#40
It was before 2010, while I was living in Winnipeg.
Nikon D3100 with Tokina 28-70mm f3.5, (I like to use a Vivitar .43x aux on the 28-70mm Tokina), Nikkor 10.5 mm fisheye, Quanteray 70-300mm f4.5, ProOptic 500 mm f6.3 mirror lens. http://donschaefferphoto.blogspot.com/
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#41
(Jan 8, 2016, 16:24)Freeman Wrote: Hi Graham

Could this be street? It's candid, people doing something and with a humorous sub plot...(not a new shot by the way and Ed was not impressed on grounds of hygiene but it is life in the raw!) Or does street have to be western urban?

Cheers

Jeff
Jeff, Now you're cookin' with gas! That's a crackerjack street shot. I tip my hat to you, sir.
GrahamS
Take my advice.  I'm not using it.Wink

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#42
Occasionally someone may object to having their photo taken in the street - as long as they are in a public place, I usually advise them to put a paper bag over their head if they don't like it. There are CCTV cameras on every corner anyway. The only time I concur is when there are children around - for reasons that I don't fully understand, modern society seems to believe that anyone who uses a camera in public where there are children is a pervert of some kind, never mind the mobile/cell 'phone camera in everyone's pocket and the 180 million pictures, mostly of children doing "cute" things, that are posted to social media every day.
GrahamS
Take my advice.  I'm not using it.Wink

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#43
If anyone is interested, you can see more of my street shots here:
https://flic.kr/s/aHsksdddMf

Not all are good, and I haven't had time to caption them yet, but comments would be appreciated here.
GrahamS
Take my advice.  I'm not using it.Wink

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#44
Hi all
I am new to this forum just to let you know I agree with all the comments on street photography, most of my street shots tend to be taken at events where almost every man an his dog has a camera so taking shots of people doing natural things become a lot easier espically with a longer lens, going out in groups with compact cameras short lens also works because people think your part of a camera club or group and mostly accept what is happing, going solo takes more currage, some of the more accomplished street photographers will actually pretend to be photographing a building then when their chosen target reaches the correct position they then refocus and get the shot.

the shots below are from the Goodwood Revival

Pete


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RAW to the core.
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#45
Welcome to the forums, Eddy! Nice to have you here! Thanks for adding your photos!
Barbara - Life is what you make of it!
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#46
Pete, what software do you use to get such subtle, painterly, colours?
Ask yourself, "What's most important for the final image?".
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#47
Lightroom? Ed.
To each his own!
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#48
(Jan 10, 2016, 09:58)Jocko Wrote: Pete, what software do you use to get such subtle, painterly, colours?

Light room and Photoshop I get the image to where I want it to be and then desaturate to achieve that old world feel.

Pete
RAW to the core.
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#49
Thanks, I'll give that a try.
Ask yourself, "What's most important for the final image?".
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#50
Nice work, Pete. Well done. You have a unique style to your images.
GrahamS
Take my advice.  I'm not using it.Wink

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