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Is accessability harmful to the craft of photography? - Printable Version

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Is accessability harmful to the craft of photography? - shuttertalk - Mar 3, 2012

Photography is becoming more accessible to everyone. Not only are quality cameras and equipment more affordable and readily available, intelligent auto and creative modes allow users to take perfectly exposed and focused images effortlessly. Software and post processing tools are also available both in camera (the 5D mark III has HDR mode built in) and out of camera, with filters, effects, vignettes, textures all a click away.

Furthermore the internet and social media is making it easier for people to share and gain a following, (think flickr, instagram, facebook, blogger etc) -- encouraging other people to emulate them, irregardless of whether they are using the correct techniques.

Do you see this as a good thing or a bad thing for photography? Is it a positive that the barriers to creativity are being removed, or do you see it as a watering down of the craft?


RE: Is accessability harmful to the craft of photography? - Toad - Mar 4, 2012

Only relevant if you are trying to sell your work. If you are, then thousands of people giving their work away is a problem. If you are not trying to make your living by selling your work, its refreshing to see creative things done in many mediums, Of course, you also see a lot of crap, yes?


RE: Is accessability harmful to the craft of photography? - thistledoo - Mar 4, 2012

Great thread Smile

I think I agree with Toad…. It's great to see so much info on the subject floating around now so people like myself can learn, but it is a little disheartening to see the "crap" that some "professionals" put out there Smile. There is a lot of talent out there as well, don't get me wrong, it's just sad to see that talent find it hard to make a living.


RE: Is accessability harmful to the craft of photography? - shuttertalk - Mar 4, 2012

Thanks for your responses everyone... I for one welcome this accessibility to the masses - street photography is one area which is becoming prolific and we are able to explore the world through the viewfinders of others. Does it matter that they don't know the difference between a f-stop and a bus stop?


RE: Is accessability harmful to the craft of photography? - Don Schaeffer - Mar 4, 2012

I am one who benefitted from the opening up of photography. Now I have had a little practice and the fact that beginners can do better than I is an embarrassment.


RE: Is accessability harmful to the craft of photography? - NT73 - Mar 4, 2012

The talent is all on shuttertalk. Big Grin



RE: Is accessability harmful to the craft of photography? - Scottbad - Mar 5, 2012

(Mar 4, 2012, 00:51)Toad Wrote: Only relevant if you are trying to sell your work. If you are, then thousands of people giving their work away is a problem. If you are not trying to make your living by selling your work, its refreshing to see creative things done in many mediums, Of course, you also see a lot of crap, yes?

Exactly, the quality of the work would be a lower but there would undoubtedly be a few gems.


RE: Is accessability harmful to the craft of photography? - Zig - Mar 6, 2012

I'm inclined to thistledoo's summation of some "professional" efforts...yet if my livelihood and that of my family were dependent on photography for income, I'd gladly shoot to generate cash first and creative integrity pretty far down the order.
I'd also say be of Good Cheer: many a punter buys a camera that does all the thinking for them...and they still invariably are unable to turn out anything otehr than tripe. Well-exposed, sharp tripe too...which is then the equivalent of polishing a turd.
Also, I find it wonderful that with so many camera systems, all of which are highly adept at covering or erasing error or lack of knowledge, photographers still manage to shoot and develop their own style. Excellence is still excellence, after all: it may well be that a snapper's excellence is anathematised by jealousy rather than lauded and pursued as a benchmark, but excellence will always cause a reaction.