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Who is your mentor? Which photographer inspires you?
#1
Hello Shuttertalkers,
Because this community has photographers of all levels: beginners, amateurs and professionals it would be interesting to share with each other what photographers inspired you along your career. 
Are you a fan of old school photographers or you rather resonate with contempary photographers?

I'm 25 and I grew up in digital era but still wanted to know about the pioneers of photography and started reading about Hansel Adams, Alfred Stieglitz, Robert Capa and Bresson. Their approach to photography was very organic and original and i always was intrigued by that, was it because the acces to information was not as available as today and they had to use their immagination and discover by trial and error?
The history of photography is realy fascinating but my career was inspired more by contemporary photogrphers like Steve Mccury, Dan Winters and Chirtopher Anderson for portrait photography. In commercial area i would name Jeff Lipsky, Joey Lawrence and Tim Tadder.

I'm very curious, what photographers inspired you?
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#2
Yusef Karsh, Sebastio Salgado and Garry Bernstein, in that order. Traditional silver halide analogue photography required far more knowledge and attention to technique compared to the digital photography of today. I remember taking two days to expose one 4x5 B&W negative and get it right, and then another whole day to print it 20 x 24". Today it could all be done before morning tea......
GrahamS
Take my advice.  I'm not using it.Wink

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#3
(Apr 10, 2017, 04:53)GrahamS Wrote: Yusef Karsh, Sebastio Salgado and Garry Bernstein, in that order.  Traditional silver halide analogue photography required far more knowledge and attention to technique compared to the digital photography of today.  I remember taking two days to expose one 4x5 B&W negative and get it right, and then another whole day to print it 20 x 24".   Today it could all be done before morning tea......
I also like Salgado and his farm forestation project , I watched his speech on TEDx 
 Spending 2 days to get a good picture,that is impressive. I'm sure that putting so much work in a picture added so much value to it, a photo was much more valued. Nowadays is just so easy, but i guess this gives you the oportunity to think more about what composition, light etc.
Well apreciated insight Graham, thank you!
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#4
For me it's a friend, he's a fantastic photographer. Sadly he is currently battling advanced cancer.

From a higher level, I find the work of Ansel Adams fascinating, and for a more modern photographer I like Zach Arias... street and portraits are always different.
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#5
The people I've followed during my photography studies were Anton Corbijn, HansPeter van Velthoven(NL) and Annie Leibovitz, because at that time I was mostly involved in shooting concerts, while dreaming about shooting rockbands on tour.

While finishing my studies with an internship at Martin Hogeboom (NL) I can proudly say he became my mentor after that.
Next to sending me some nice photojobs sometimes or hiring me to work for some of his clients (which were quite a few big businesses)
He also showed me the work of Joe McNally, Chase Jarvis and Joey Lawrence which I've been following on the internet ever since.
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#6
Chase Jarvis does some very interesting work, his vlogs are worth a watch too!
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#7
(Apr 17, 2017, 16:14)EnglishBob Wrote: Chase Jarvis does some very interesting work, his vlogs are worth a watch too!
Definitely! Creative Live is very inspiring!
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#8
There are so many photographers I love - many of them the old "classics" such as Andre Kertesz and Robert Frank. But many more modern ones, too. The list would be very long.

But as regards mentors there are two main ones. First is Leigh Preston, who is my photographer teacher. A Fellow of the RPS, super photographer, great teacher, and very inspiring. I'm very lucky to be able to sit in his classroom every few weeks. Secondly I'm a massive Adam Marelli fan. His old and new blog, his on-line courses are exceptional. I don't always go for his subject matter, but where he scores highly for me is that he's more likely to talk art than photography, be it colours, composition, lighting, he takes as much from the old masters as he does photography. I find that approach really works for me and helps me get a more painterly output.. In a way I guess you could say my two favourite photographers are Caravaggio and Rembrandt!
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#9
(Apr 13, 2017, 01:30)EnglishBob Wrote: For me it's a friend, he's a fantastic photographer.  Sadly he is currently battling advanced cancer.

From a higher level, I find the work of Ansel Adams fascinating, and for a more modern photographer I like Zach Arias... street and portraits are always different.
Hi Bob
Sorry to heard this about your friend, i hope he wins this battle.
I read a few articles about Zach Arias and i kind of found myself in his story.I also thought about giving up photography and pursue an engineering career, due to financial reasons, eventually i decided to grind my way up.I had to give up financial security to pursue my passion. It's hard but this is how is supposed to be, nothing valuable comes easy.
Regards,
Robert
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#10
Kudos to you, Robert. Financial security is a tough thing to give up. I recall once, many years ago, the band I was in was doing pretty well and the other guys in the band wanted to turn pro'. I just couldn't risk it - had a mortgage, was married, lots of out-goings, etc. I couldn't for the life of me work out how the band could even return a 10th of what my job paid. As all of that money went on bills and anything less would leave me in debt I ended up leaving the band so as not to hold them back.

Maybe it was the wrong decision? We only get one life and it's better to regret something we do rather than something we don't. But I think my monetary stress levels would have gone through the roof.

The band didn't make it, by the way. In fact they never really turned pro'. I think they quite liked having me there as an excuse - 'we'd have turned pro if it hadn't been for Derek' type-thing. Once I was no longer there as an excuse I think they all realised the reality :-)
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#11
There are many awesome super-star photographers which I find inspiring such as Jay Maisel, Jack Dykinga, Tom Mangelson, David Norton, etc. However I've personally found it easier to be inspired by less intimidating names.
Wilson Tsoi is an amazing photographer, he is equally capable to shoot awesome pictures with a compact camera than a DSLR. He has an amazing eye for composition and his love for night photography is comparable to mine.
Michael Reichmann inspired me early on too as a master of composition simplicity. Amid the chaos of places like Bangladesh he still manage to capture simple yet powerful images.
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#12
There are many in old classic and also in modern too... But if I say a name it would be Ansel Adams, there is something impressing me deeply...  


[Image: ansel_adams02.jpg]

[Image: Ansel-Adams-Quotes-iPhone-Photography-9.jpg]
“There are no rules for good photographs, there are only good photographs.”

Ansel Adams



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#13
That's a good question. My friend named Sady who is a professional product photographer inspire me most. I learn a lot from him.
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